Sotos Syndrome Sotos syndrome is characterized by high birth length, rapid bone growth, distinctive facial features, and possible verbal and motor delays. It may be the result of an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and it is more common in males than females. Developmental deficits or specific learning problems may be present. Speech ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   January 01, 1996
Sotos Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine M. Shuey
    East Stroudsburg University, Speech Pathology and Audiology Department, 200 Prospect Street, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301–2999
  • Kristen Jamison
    Westchester Association for Retarded Citizens, White Plains, NY
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   January 01, 1996
Sotos Syndrome
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1996, Vol. 27, 91-93. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2701.91
History: Received December 2, 1994 , Accepted March 2, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1996, Vol. 27, 91-93. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2701.91
History: Received December 2, 1994; Accepted March 2, 1995

Sotos syndrome is characterized by high birth length, rapid bone growth, distinctive facial features, and possible verbal and motor delays. It may be the result of an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and it is more common in males than females. Developmental deficits or specific learning problems may be present. Speech and language delays may occur, although reported cases vary from normal development to severe delays. Hoarse voice is not uncommon.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Portions of this material were presented at the 1992 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Antonio, Texas.
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