Computer-Based Assessment of Word Knowledge in Teens With Learning Disabilities Computer-based and standard administrations of the Test of Word Knowledge (TOWK)-Level 2 core subtests (Word Definitions, Synonyms, Figurative Usage, Multiple Contexts) (Wiig & Secord, 1992) were compared for 30 subjects with learning disabilities. Half completed the computer-based version first and half the standard version first. Three weeks later, subjects were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1996
Computer-Based Assessment of Word Knowledge in Teens With Learning Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elisabeth H. Wiig, PhD
    Boston University, Boston, MA, 5211 Vicksburg Drive, Arlington, TX 76017
  • Stephanie S. Jones
    The Winston School, Dallas, TX
  • Erik D. Wiig
    The Wiig Group, Arlington, TX
Article Information
Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1996
Computer-Based Assessment of Word Knowledge in Teens With Learning Disabilities
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1996, Vol. 27, 21-28. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2701.21
History: Received March 10, 1994 , Accepted November 4, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1996, Vol. 27, 21-28. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2701.21
History: Received March 10, 1994; Accepted November 4, 1994

Computer-based and standard administrations of the Test of Word Knowledge (TOWK)-Level 2 core subtests (Word Definitions, Synonyms, Figurative Usage, Multiple Contexts) (Wiig & Secord, 1992) were compared for 30 subjects with learning disabilities. Half completed the computer-based version first and half the standard version first. Three weeks later, subjects were given either the standard or computer-based version in a counterbalanced design. The total, receptive, and expressive composites and three subtest means were highest for the standard administration (p<.05). Correlation coefficients (r) ranged from .81 to .88 for composites (p<.01). Confidence intervals (at 90% level) overlapped in 93% for the total, 97% for the receptive, and 93% for the expressive composite. Paired total scores were within the same diagnostic category (below or at/above normal) for 87%, receptive for 83%, and expressive for 90% of the subjects. Differenes in task formats influenced the results, indicating the need for independent norms for computer-based adaptations of standardized language tests.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge The Psychological Corporation for granting permission to develop and research this computer version of TOWK-2. We also express our gratitude to the students and staff at the Winston School in Dallas for supporting the research. Erik Wiig was the designer and programmer of TOWK-CB. The reviewers’ corrections and constructive suggestions are gratefully acknowledged.
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