Expanding Norms for Narration Narrative development in school-age children and adolescents is important to speech-language pathologists providing language intervention. At this time, information on later narrative development and growth in particular dimensions of narration is only partially available. The purpose of the present article is to pave the way for the collection of a ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1995
Expanding Norms for Narration
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia J. Johnson
    University of Illinois, Champaign
  • Contact author: Cynthia J. Johnson, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois. 901 S. Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820.
    Contact author: Cynthia J. Johnson, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois. 901 S. Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820.×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Clinical Forum: Language Norms in Children and Adolescents
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1995
Expanding Norms for Narration
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1995, Vol. 26, 326-341. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2604.326
History: Received October 19, 1993 , Accepted November 21, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1995, Vol. 26, 326-341. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2604.326
History: Received October 19, 1993; Accepted November 21, 1994

Narrative development in school-age children and adolescents is important to speech-language pathologists providing language intervention. At this time, information on later narrative development and growth in particular dimensions of narration is only partially available. The purpose of the present article is to pave the way for the collection of a comprehensive set of norms for later narrative development. The article first considers the purposes and uses for norms in narration. Next, for practical consideration, it reviews information that currently exists for later narrative development, including published literature and diagnostic tests. Proceeding further, the article explores factors that make the expansion of current norms problematic, such as substantial ranges in storytelling ability at particular ages, situational variations, and the diversity of narrative genres. it concludes by suggesting factors to consider in future investigations undertaken in pursuit of an ideal set of norms.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work is based on a miniseminar presented at the 1992 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), entitled “School-Age Children and Adolescents: Establishing Language Norms.” The author would like to thank Marilyn Nippold for organizing the miniseminar, and Special Interest Division 1 of ASHA, Language Acquisition and Disorders of Language Acquisition, for sponsoring it. The author also would like to thank Matthew Schiel, Christopher Wiley, David Tarvin, and many other children for contributing their stones and artwork to her study of narrative development. Finally, thanks are extended to Charissa Lansing for her advice in selecting and preparing figures, and to Alan Kamhi, Wayne Secord, and two anonymous reviewers for comments that greatly enhanced the presentation of this work.
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