Legal Issues and Computer Use by School-Based Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists The purpose of this report is to review the ethical and legal issues regarding the integration and application of computer technologies into the schools, particularly when used by speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Four broad issues are addressed: (a) software copyright and licensed use, (b) information access and the right to ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1995
Legal Issues and Computer Use by School-Based Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael K. Wynne, PhD
    Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN
  • David S. Hurst
    Wichita State University, Wichita, KS
  • Contact author: Michael K. Wynne, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, Riley Hospital for Children, Suite 0860, 702 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5230.
    Contact author: Michael K. Wynne, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, Riley Hospital for Children, Suite 0860, 702 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5230.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Clinical Forum: Computer Applications in Schools
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1995
Legal Issues and Computer Use by School-Based Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1995, Vol. 26, 251-259. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2603.251
History: Received May 4, 1993 , Accepted October 28, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1995, Vol. 26, 251-259. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2603.251
History: Received May 4, 1993; Accepted October 28, 1993

The purpose of this report is to review the ethical and legal issues regarding the integration and application of computer technologies into the schools, particularly when used by speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Four broad issues are addressed: (a) software copyright and licensed use, (b) information access and the right to privacy, (c) computer-assisted or computer-administrated assessment and intervention, and (d) documentation. When using computer technologies, the practicing clinician should focus on clinical competencies and professional responsibilities in order to avoid the ethical pitfalls and legal traps associated with the integration of these technologies into schools. This is best achieved when the clinician has a current and broad knowledge domain, displays sound clinical judgment, and demonstrates competent clinical skills when applying computer technologies.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to express their appreciation to Julie Masterson, Richard Katz. and an anonymous reviewer for their suggestions and comments on earlier versions of this manuscript.
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