Computer Applications in the Schools What We Can Do—What We Should Do Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1995
Computer Applications in the Schools
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson
    Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield
  • Contact author: Julie J. Masterson, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65804. E-mail: jjm095f@vma.smsu.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum: Computer Applications in Schools
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1995
Computer Applications in the Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1995, Vol. 26, 211-212. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2603.211
History: Received October 5, 1994 , Accepted November 3, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1995, Vol. 26, 211-212. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2603.211
History: Received October 5, 1994; Accepted November 3, 1994
Almost 2 decades ago, magazines such as Radio Electronics and Popular Mechanics advertised the first “home computers” (Goldstein, 1986). These machines were somewhat primitive by today’s standards, but they were inexpensive and could play simple games. In 1977, Apple introduced the Apple II, which sold for $1,195 and became one of the first machines that could be used in the home or by a professional at his or her desk. In 1981, International Business Machines (IBM) entered the microcomputer market with its “personal computer.” Prompted by record sales for both Apple and IBM, other companies quickly entered the market. Initially, most of the software consisted of games, but developers soon focused attention on more practical applications, such as word processing.
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