Treating the Child Who Stutters With Concomitant Language or Phonological Impairment When children who stutter also demonstrate speech or language problems, establishing efficacious and reasonable therapy objectives can be difficult. This article discusses diagnostic considerations in identifying coexisting communication disorders and in differentiating between stuttering and secondary fluency disorders related to language formulation. A number of options for structuring therapy for ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 1995
Treating the Child Who Stutters With Concomitant Language or Phonological Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nan Bernstein Ratner
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Contact author: Nan Bernstein Ratner, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.
    Contact author: Nan Bernstein Ratner, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Treating Fluency Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 1995
Treating the Child Who Stutters With Concomitant Language or Phonological Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1995, Vol. 26, 180-186. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2602.180
History: Received June 16, 1993 , Accepted October 28, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1995, Vol. 26, 180-186. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2602.180
History: Received June 16, 1993; Accepted October 28, 1993

When children who stutter also demonstrate speech or language problems, establishing efficacious and reasonable therapy objectives can be difficult. This article discusses diagnostic considerations in identifying coexisting communication disorders and in differentiating between stuttering and secondary fluency disorders related to language formulation. A number of options for structuring therapy for coexisting problems are evaluated, including blended, lagged, and cycled approaches. Concerns implicit in the treatment of coexisting linguistic and fluency problems also are reviewed.

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