Working With 7- to 12-Year-Old Children Who Stutter Ideas for Intervention in the Public Schools Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 1995
Working With 7- to 12-Year-Old Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter R. Ramig
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Ellen M. Bennett
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Contact author: Peter Ramig, Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Sciences, Campus Box 409, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309.
    Contact author: Peter Ramig, Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Sciences, Campus Box 409, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Treating Fluency Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 1995
Working With 7- to 12-Year-Old Children Who Stutter
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1995, Vol. 26, 138-150. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2602.138
History: Received June 3, 1993 , Accepted October 28, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1995, Vol. 26, 138-150. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2602.138
History: Received June 3, 1993; Accepted October 28, 1993

The public school speech-language clinician is encouraged to intervene with the school-age child who stutters. The importance of including parents and teachers in the therapeutic process is addressed, and viewing intervention along a therapy continuum incorporating both fluency-shaping and stuttering modification philosophies is recommended. Other topics presented include (a) assessment, (b) establishing fluency in the younger child, (c) a conceptual model of intervention, (d) addressing attitudes and feelings, (e) dealing with concomitant problems, (f) grouping and scheduling, (g) examples of intervention programs, and (h) transfer and maintenance issues. Future trends in this area also are addressed, including discussions on service delivery models, fluency specialists, innovative programs, and speech therapy for credit. This article concludes with a discussion of issues surrounding treatment efficacy.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to thank Susan Meyers Fosnot for her invaluable editorial assistance and direction in improving the first draft of this paper. In addition, the authors would like to thank reviewer Jon Hasbrouck and unidentified “reviewer B” for his or her constructive editorial comments and suggestions. The helpful suggestions received by all three reviewers are appreciated.
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