Parental Involvement in the Treatment of Stuttering This article presents the view that parental involvement is essential in the effective management of children who stutter. Our assessment procedures provide clinicians with the basis for ensuring full parental participation. Three approaches are proposed that reflect the changes in the type and degree of involvement required and the therapy ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 1995
Parental Involvement in the Treatment of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lena Rustin
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England
  • Frances Cook
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England
  • Contact author: Lena Rustin, Speech and Language Therapy Services, National Temperance Hospital, 3rd floor, Vesey Strong Wing, 112 Hampstead Road. London NW1 2LT.
    Contact author: Lena Rustin, Speech and Language Therapy Services, National Temperance Hospital, 3rd floor, Vesey Strong Wing, 112 Hampstead Road. London NW1 2LT.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Forum: Treating Fluency Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 1995
Parental Involvement in the Treatment of Stuttering
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1995, Vol. 26, 127-137. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2602.127
History: Received July 20, 1993 , Accepted August 18, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1995, Vol. 26, 127-137. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2602.127
History: Received July 20, 1993; Accepted August 18, 1994

This article presents the view that parental involvement is essential in the effective management of children who stutter. Our assessment procedures provide clinicians with the basis for ensuring full parental participation. Three approaches are proposed that reflect the changes in the type and degree of involvement required and the therapy goals for different age groups. The first approach considers parent-child interaction skills as a basis for facilitating the development of fluency skills in young children. Intensive group therapy programs are then suggested for the age groups 7–14 and 15–18 years, with differing degrees of parental input.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
We would like to thank Willie Botterill for her time and energy in preparing the manuscript.
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