Children With Language Impairment in Cooperative Work Groups A Pilot Study Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2000
Children With Language Impairment in Cooperative Work Groups
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Elizabeth C. Montague
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Julie L. Hanton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Bonnie_Brinton@byu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Clinical Forum: Roles of Speech-Language Pathologists in Inclusionary Classrooms
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2000
Children With Language Impairment in Cooperative Work Groups
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2000, Vol. 31, 252-264. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3103.252
History: Received September 30, 1999 , Accepted March 21, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2000, Vol. 31, 252-264. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3103.252
History: Received September 30, 1999; Accepted March 21, 2000

Purpose: This pilot study examined the manner in which the individual social-behavioral profiles of children with language impairment (LI) influenced their ability to work within cooperative groups.

Method: Six children with LI each participated in four different cooperative work groups. In each of these groups, the child with LI interacted with two typically developing children (for a total of 48 different typical children). Groups were structured to make it possible for the child with LI to play a meaningful role in the interactions (e.g., assignment of specific roles). The success of each of these interactions was evaluated to determine the extent to which all of the children participated and worked together toward a joint goal. Social profiles of each of the children with LI were obtained using the Teacher Behavioral Rating Scale (TBRS, Hart & Robinson, 1996). The success of the collaborative work of each triad was then considered in light of the child's social profile.

Results: The success of the individual interactions was highly variable from child to child. However, the social profile of the child with LI appeared to be a good predictor of the child's ability to work with other members of the triad toward a joint goal.

Clinical Implications: In facilitating cooperative groups, teachers and speech-language pathologists need to consider the social profiles, as well as the language levels, of children with LI who participate. Children who show withdrawn behaviors may need support to help them become more responsive to their partners. Children with LI who show withdrawn as well as aggressive behaviors may need a variety of accommodations, including specific intervention designed to help them understand the value of working with others.

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