Practice Makes Perfect The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   April 01, 2000
Practice Makes Perfect
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    University of Oregon, Eugene
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   April 01, 2000
Practice Makes Perfect
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2000, Vol. 31, 182-186. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3102.182
History: Received December 18, 1998 , Accepted December 8, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2000, Vol. 31, 182-186. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3102.182
History: Received December 18, 1998; Accepted December 8, 1999

In this article, the possibility is raised that some children may implicitly view the therapy situation as one in which new sounds and language forms are learned and practiced. In contrast, the primary purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Inherent in this view of therapy and non-therapy is the incompatibility or inconsistency between practicing speech and communicating effectively. What led me to recognize this inconsistency and consider its potential clinical implications was the way in which my daughter Franne dealt with her phonological disorder.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I would like to thank Karen Pollock and Marilyn Nippold for their helpful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. I would also like to thank my daughter Franne for giving me the opportunity to observe firsthand the resolution of a phonological disorder and allowing me to share her experience with others.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access