A Preliminary Investigation of Dynamic Assessment With Native American Kindergartners Purpose: This study examined dynamic assessment as a lessbiased evaluation procedure for assessing the languagelearning ability of Native American children. Method: Twenty-three Arapahoe/Shoshone kindergartners were identified as stronger (n = 15) or weaker (n = 8) language learners through teacher report and examiner classroom observation. Through a test-teach-test protocol, participants ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2000
A Preliminary Investigation of Dynamic Assessment With Native American Kindergartners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa A. Ukrainetz
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Stacey Harpell
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Chandra Walsh
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Catherine Coyle
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tukraine@uwyo.edu
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2000
A Preliminary Investigation of Dynamic Assessment With Native American Kindergartners
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2000, Vol. 31, 142-154. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3102.142
History: Received July 15, 1999 , Accepted December 27, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2000, Vol. 31, 142-154. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3102.142
History: Received July 15, 1999; Accepted December 27, 1999

Purpose: This study examined dynamic assessment as a lessbiased evaluation procedure for assessing the languagelearning ability of Native American children.

Method: Twenty-three Arapahoe/Shoshone kindergartners were identified as stronger (n = 15) or weaker (n = 8) language learners through teacher report and examiner classroom observation. Through a test-teach-test protocol, participants were briefly taught the principles of categorization. Participant responses to learning were measured in terms of an index of modifiability and post-test categorization scores. The modifiability index, determined during the teaching phase, was a combined score reflecting the child's learning strategies, such as ability to attend, plan, and self-regulate, and the child's responses to the learning situation. Post-test scores consisted of performance on expressive and receptive subtests from a standardized categorization test after partialling out pretest score differences. Effect sizes and confidence intervals were also determined.

Results: Group and individual results indicated that modifiability and post-test scores were significantly greater for stronger than for weaker language learners. The response to modifiability components was a better discriminator than was the learner strategies components.

Clinical Implications: These results provide support for the further development of dynamic assessment as a valid measure of language learning ability in minority children.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to thank the Arapahoe/Shoshone community for the welcome provided, and Fort Washakie elementary school principal, teachers, students, and parents for their participation in this project.
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