The Efficacy of Phonological Awareness Intervention for Children With Spoken Language Impairment Purpose: This study investigated the efficacy of an integrated phonological awareness intervention approach for children with spoken language impairment (SLI) who demonstrated early reading delay. Ninety-one, 5- to 7-year-old New Zealand children participated in this study: 61 children with SLI and 30 children with typically developing speech and language skills. ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   April 01, 2000
The Efficacy of Phonological Awareness Intervention for Children With Spoken Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail T. Gillon
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2000
The Efficacy of Phonological Awareness Intervention for Children With Spoken Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2000, Vol. 31, 126-141. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3102.126
History: Received September 22, 1999 , Accepted December 17, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2000, Vol. 31, 126-141. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3102.126
History: Received September 22, 1999; Accepted December 17, 1999

Purpose: This study investigated the efficacy of an integrated phonological awareness intervention approach for children with spoken language impairment (SLI) who demonstrated early reading delay. Ninety-one, 5- to 7-year-old New Zealand children participated in this study: 61 children with SLI and 30 children with typically developing speech and language skills. All of the children with language impairment exhibited expressive phonological difficulties and some also had delayed semantic and syntactic development.

Method: The children with SLI participated in either: (a) an integrated phonological awareness program, (b) a more traditional speech-language intervention control program that focused on improving articulation and language skills, or (c) a minimal intervention control program over a 4 1/2-month time period.

Results: Effects of the interventions on phonological awareness ability, reading performance, and speech production were examined. The children who received phonological awareness intervention made significantly more gains in their phonological awareness ability and reading development than the children receiving the other types of speech and language intervention. Despite significant delays in phonological awareness prior to training, children who received the phonological awareness intervention reached levels of performance similar to children with typically developing speech and language skills at post-test assessment. The phonological awareness intervention also improved the children's speech articulation.

Clinical Implications: The findings suggest that integrated phonological awareness intervention may be an efficient method to improve phonological awareness, speech production, and reading development of children with SLI. Findings are discussed with reference to a speech-literacy link model.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was funded by the New Zealand Foundation for Research Science and Technology. The author wishes to express her sincere thanks to the Foundation for its support. The author also acknowledges the assistance of New Zealand Specialist Education Services and in particular expresses deepest thanks to the speech-language pathologists who participated in the project. To the children, their families and teachers who participated so cooperatively, the author offers her thanks and appreciation. The author would also like to thank Ilsa Schwarz for her support and manuscript editing, Irene Hudson for assistance with the sample effect size analyses, and the journal editors and reviewers for their useful comments on an earlier version of this paper.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access