Language Sample Analysis in Spanish-Speaking Children Methodological Considerations Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   January 01, 2000
Language Sample Analysis in Spanish-Speaking Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vera F. Gutiérrez-Clellen
    San Diego State University, CA
  • M. Adelaida Restrepo
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Lisa Bedore
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Elizabeth Peña
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Raquel Anderson
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: vclellen@mail.sdsu.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   January 01, 2000
Language Sample Analysis in Spanish-Speaking Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2000, Vol. 31, 88-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.88
History: Received December 28, 1998 , Accepted June 22, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2000, Vol. 31, 88-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.88
History: Received December 28, 1998; Accepted June 22, 1999

The purposes of this article are (a) to discuss issues related to the selection and development of language assessment procedures for children who speak Spanish and English based on spontaneous language samples and (b) to show how available procedures can be applied to research and clinical aims with these children. Sociolinguistic influences in the language performance of Spanish-speaking children, including patterns of language shift, differences in the amount of exposure to each of a bilingual's languages, and contextual effects of different language-learning environments, are discussed. Methodological issues and effects of codeswitching and dialect are examined concerning use of the Developmental Assessment of Spanish Grammar (DASG), mean length of response in words (MLR-w), mean length of terminable unit (MLTU), and mean length of utterance in morphemes (MLU-m). Measures of Spanish grammar with diagnostic potential are proposed. Clinical suggestions for the language assessment of Spanish-speaking children with different levels of English proficiency and research implications are discussed.

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