Serving Students With Dysphagia in the Schools? Educational Preparation Is Essential! Speech-language pathologists employed in public schools are increasingly being faced with serving students with dysphagia because schools are serving students who may have previously been served in health care or institutional facilities. Students with significant health problems, severe disabilities, or orthopedic impairments may require the services of a school team—a ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2000
Serving Students With Dysphagia in the Schools? Educational Preparation Is Essential!
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lissa Power-deFur
    Virginia Department of Education, Richmond
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Forum: Identification and Management of Dysphagia
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2000
Serving Students With Dysphagia in the Schools? Educational Preparation Is Essential!
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2000, Vol. 31, 76-78. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.76
History: Received September 21, 1998 , Accepted September 27, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2000, Vol. 31, 76-78. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.76
History: Received September 21, 1998; Accepted September 27, 1999

Speech-language pathologists employed in public schools are increasingly being faced with serving students with dysphagia because schools are serving students who may have previously been served in health care or institutional facilities. Students with significant health problems, severe disabilities, or orthopedic impairments may require the services of a school team—a team that may not include any person with adequate training in swallowing evaluation and treatment. Speechlanguage pathologists should not provide services to students with dysphagia without pursuing continuing education to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills. To do so would compromise the speech-language pathologist's ethical standards, jeopardize the student's health, and create undue liability for the school division.

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