Family-Responsive Individualized Family Service Plans for Speech-Language Pathologists Speech-language pathologists are the most frequent providers of services to infants and toddlers who have disabilities and their families. Because of this role, they are often involved with the family in the development of the individualized family service plan (IFSP). The Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2000
Family-Responsive Individualized Family Service Plans for Speech-Language Pathologists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Polmanteer
    The University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Vicki Turbiville
    The University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Vicki@DOLE.LSI.UKANS.EDU
  • Both authors contributed equally to this article.
    Both authors contributed equally to this article.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2000
Family-Responsive Individualized Family Service Plans for Speech-Language Pathologists
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2000, Vol. 31, 4-14. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.04
History: Received July 7, 1998 , Accepted April 5, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2000, Vol. 31, 4-14. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.04
History: Received July 7, 1998; Accepted April 5, 1999

Speech-language pathologists are the most frequent providers of services to infants and toddlers who have disabilities and their families. Because of this role, they are often involved with the family in the development of the individualized family service plan (IFSP). The Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children has developed a set of recommended practices for the development of the IFSP that reflects family-centered practices. This article describes those recommended practices and provides a summary of recent research examining their use in Kansas as an example of how they can be used as a component of program review. The authors also provide suggestions of how speech-language pathologists can apply recommended practices in developing family-centered IFSPs for young children with speech and/or language disabilities.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to acknowledge the help of Infant-Toddler Services, Kansas Department of Health and Environment in making available the IFSPs reviewed for this research. Their interest in providing better services to infants and toddlers and their families in Kansas made this work possible.
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