Is Sensory Integration Effective for Children With Language-Learning Disorders? A Critical Review of the Evidence Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1999
Is Sensory Integration Effective for Children With Language-Learning Disorders?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mona R. Griffer
    Marywood University, Scranton, PA
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: griffer@ac.marywood.edu
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1999
Is Sensory Integration Effective for Children With Language-Learning Disorders?
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1999, Vol. 30, 393-400. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3004.393
History: Received December 3, 1998 , Accepted June 30, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1999, Vol. 30, 393-400. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3004.393
History: Received December 3, 1998; Accepted June 30, 1999

Sensory integration therapy has become widely accepted as an intervention for enhancing language-learning disorders and academic difficulties in hildren. However, much controversy surrounds this approach because of the small amount of empirical evidence to support its application to this clinical population. The purpose of this article is threefold: review the relevant research pertaining to treatment efficacy studies involving sensory integration conducted over the last three decades, discuss the perspectives from which various researchers and clinicians view language disorders in children, and discuss parameters for evaluating efficacy studies and the clinical use of sensory integration, suggesting directions for future research.

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