Clinical Decision-Making in the Assessment and Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders Central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs) are fraught with problems arising from confusion concerning the clinical evidence of the disorder. A major controversy revolves around characterizing the disorder as a unique cluster of behaviors reflecting impairment in some underlying mechanism(s) or as a disorder defined on the basis of performance on ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1999
Clinical Decision-Making in the Assessment and Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandy Friel-Patti
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: sfp@utdallas.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1999
Clinical Decision-Making in the Assessment and Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1999, Vol. 30, 345-352. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3004.345
History: Received March 3, 1999 , Accepted June 30, 1999
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1999, Vol. 30, 345-352. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3004.345
History: Received March 3, 1999; Accepted June 30, 1999

Central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs) are fraught with problems arising from confusion concerning the clinical evidence of the disorder. A major controversy revolves around characterizing the disorder as a unique cluster of behaviors reflecting impairment in some underlying mechanism(s) or as a disorder defined on the basis of performance on a set of tests. This article reviews some recent developments in auditory processing research and considers the role of the speech-language pathologist in evaluating and treating children with suspected auditory processing problems. Particular attention is given to clinical criteria, including characteristics of the population, assessment, and intervention considerations. Areas for clinical caution are highlighted.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Preparation of this article was partially supported by a grant from the Excellence in Education Fund through The University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders.
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