To Use or Not to Use: Factors that Influence the Selection of New Treatment Approaches Response to Leonard (1999) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   July 01, 1999
To Use or Not to Use: Factors that Influence the Selection of New Treatment Approaches
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan Kamhi
    University of Memphis, TN
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   July 01, 1999
To Use or Not to Use: Factors that Influence the Selection of New Treatment Approaches
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1999, Vol. 30, 311-312. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3003.311b
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1999, Vol. 30, 311-312. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3003.311b
I would like to apologize to Leonard for omitting the qualifier “for some children” in quoting his interpretation of the effects of language treatment. I did not mean to misrepresent his message that treatment does, in fact, lead to normal language functioning for some children. I do not think, however, that the omission of this qualifier diminishes the overall point I was trying to make on pages 94 and 96 of Kamhi (1999) . There are children for whom treatment does not carry far enough, and these children will probably experience subsequent academic problems. The latest research indicates that at least 50% of children with language impairments in preschool or kindergarten go on to have reading disabilities (Catts, Fey, Zhang, & Tomblin, in press). Some studies put this percentage as high as 70% (Tallal, Curtiss, & Kaplan, 1989). For these children, language therapy at best may reduce the severity of the reading problem. Parents of these children should clearly be on the lookout for treatment programs that may further reduce the impact that early language problems have on academic performance.
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