Report  |   January 1995
African-American English and Linguistic Complexity in Preschool Discourse
 
Author Notes
  • ¬©American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings
Report   |   January 1995
African-American English and Linguistic Complexity in Preschool Discourse
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1995, Vol. 26, 87-93. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2601.87
History: Received March 2, 1994 , Accepted August 26, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1995, Vol. 26, 87-93. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2601.87
History: Received March 2, 1994; Accepted August 26, 1994

This study is a follow-up to that of Craig and Washington (1994) and probes further their finding of a potential positive relationship between amounts of African-American English (AAE) and linguistic complexity in the discourse of young, poor, urban African-American boys and girls. The present study used the earlier outcomes to predict a statistically significant positive relationship between AAE form use and relational semantic complexity, and nonsignificant correlations for simpler semantic relations. Findings confirmed these predictions and are interpreted as support for the continuity hypothesis proposed by Terrell and Terrell (1993).

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