Analysis of Successful Initiations of Three Children With Hearing Loss Mainstreamed in Kindergarten Classrooms The communicative interactions of three mainstreamed children who are deaf or hard of hearing (deaf/HOH) were investigated. These children were matched with a classmate who had normal hearing (NH) according to chronological age, sex, race, and socioeconomic status (SES). All subjects were white females approximately 5 years of age. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1995
Analysis of Successful Initiations of Three Children With Hearing Loss Mainstreamed in Kindergarten Classrooms
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa Murphy Hulsing
    The University of Kansas, KS
  • Barbara Luetke-Stahlman
    The University of Kansas, KS
  • Diane Frome Loeb
    The University of Kansas, KS
  • Peggy Nelson
    The University of Kansas, KS
  • Jane Wegner
    The University of Kansas, KS
  • Contact author: Barbara Luetke-Stahlman, PhD, Director Deaf Education, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66160-7605.
    Contact author: Barbara Luetke-Stahlman, PhD, Director Deaf Education, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66160-7605.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1995
Analysis of Successful Initiations of Three Children With Hearing Loss Mainstreamed in Kindergarten Classrooms
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1995, Vol. 26, 45-57. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2601.45
History: Received September 28, 1993 , Accepted June 20, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1995, Vol. 26, 45-57. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2601.45
History: Received September 28, 1993; Accepted June 20, 1994

The communicative interactions of three mainstreamed children who are deaf or hard of hearing (deaf/HOH) were investigated. These children were matched with a classmate who had normal hearing (NH) according to chronological age, sex, race, and socioeconomic status (SES). All subjects were white females approximately 5 years of age. The subjects were videotaped while involved in normal classroom activities. The videotaped interactions were coded for: (a) activity, (b) play level, (c) partner, (d) interactive status, and (e) mode of communication.

Dyad interactions were analyzed for average length, frequency, and total number of interactions. The children’s interactions varied by child and classroom setting. Results regarding the success of initiations were that one subject who is deaf initiated less often and was more successful than her peer with NH; the other subject who is deaf initiated less often and was less successful than her peer with NH; and the subject who is HOH initiated more often and was less successful than her peer with NH. Factors found to affect the success of initiations were the number of children involved and the accompaniment of actions and/or gestures with spoken or signed communication. These results suggest that children who are deaf/HOH often are less successful at initiations than children with NH, but the success of the initiations by children who are deaf/HOH may depend on more variables than past research has led us to believe (Arnold & Tremblay, 1979; Lederberg, Ryan, & Robbins, 1986; Levy Shiff & Hoffman, 1985; Vandell & George, 1981). Possible factors that contribute to interactions and successful initiations by children who are deaf/HOH are discussed.

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