Middle Ear Disorders and Hearing Loss in Native Hawaiian Preschoolers This study reported on the prevalence of middle ear disorders and hearing loss among native Hawaiian preschoolers. The subjects included children enrolled in the Kamehameha Schools on the islands of Kauai, Maui, and Oahu. At the beginning of the school year, each child received a battery of tests that included ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1995
Middle Ear Disorders and Hearing Loss in Native Hawaiian Preschoolers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Glenn Pang-Ching
    University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
  • Michael Robb
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
  • Robert Heath
    University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
  • Mona Takumi
    University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
  • Contact author: Glenn K. Pang-Ching, PhD, Division of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Hawaii, 1410 Lower Campus Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822.
    Contact author: Glenn K. Pang-Ching, PhD, Division of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Hawaii, 1410 Lower Campus Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1995
Middle Ear Disorders and Hearing Loss in Native Hawaiian Preschoolers
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1995, Vol. 26, 33-38. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2601.33
History: Received March 8, 1993 , Accepted June 6, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1995, Vol. 26, 33-38. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2601.33
History: Received March 8, 1993; Accepted June 6, 1994

This study reported on the prevalence of middle ear disorders and hearing loss among native Hawaiian preschoolers. The subjects included children enrolled in the Kamehameha Schools on the islands of Kauai, Maui, and Oahu. At the beginning of the school year, each child received a battery of tests that included pure-tone audiometry, tympanometry, acoustic reflectometry, and pneumatic otoscopy. Approximately 15% of the children failed a majority of these tests. Serial testing, involving pure-tone audiometry and tympanometry, was administered at regular intervals throughout the school year. Approximately 9–15% of the children failed both audiometric and tympanometric tests at each of the serial screenings. The results are discussed in comparison to other indigenous groups at risk for middle ear disorders and hearing loss and as evidence of the need to develop systematic screenings for Hawaii’s preschool children.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We extend our sincere thanks to the many individuals involved in this project, especially Jean Nakasato, who worked as the project speech-language pathologist, and Lynn Fujita, who assisted with the graphic displays. Also, the support from the families of the Kamehameha Schools should not go unnoticed. Their participation will hopefully serve to assist Hawaii’s children of today and tomorrow. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1992 ASHA Convention in San Antonio, TX. This project was supported by Grant No. HI33A90001 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.
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