A Program for Training Analogical Reasoning Skills in Children With Language Disorders Analogical reasoning is the ability to take existing knowledge from one situation and apply it to novel situations. This skill is a normal part of everyday experiences and is assumed to be of central importance in the learning process and cognitive development (Sternberg, 1977, 1985; Brown, 1989). Analogical reasoning ... Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   October 01, 1994
A Program for Training Analogical Reasoning Skills in Children With Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson, PhD
    Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield
    Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National Ave., Springfield, MO 65804
  • Christine D. Perrey
    Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield
  • Contact author: Juhe J Masterson, PhD, Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National Ave., Springfield, MO 65804.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   October 01, 1994
A Program for Training Analogical Reasoning Skills in Children With Language Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 268-270. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.268
History: Received March 22, 1994 , Accepted May 31, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 268-270. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.268
History: Received March 22, 1994; Accepted May 31, 1994
Analogical reasoning is the ability to take existing knowledge from one situation and apply it to novel situations. This skill is a normal part of everyday experiences and is assumed to be of central importance in the learning process and cognitive development (Sternberg, 1977, 1985; Brown, 1989). Analogical reasoning is an important factor in the lives of school-aged children. Analogies are not only used as a measurement of intellectual aptitude on several standardized tests such as the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised (Woodcock & Johnson, 1989,1990) and the Kaufman Assessment Batter)’ for Children (Kaufman & Kaufman, 1983), but are also widely used by teachers in the classroom to introduce new concepts.
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