Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Integrated Service Delivery in School Settings Results of a survey of speech-language pathologists who had adopted (i.e., adopters) or who were considering adopting (i.e., nonadopters) integrated speech and language services are presented. The survey was designed to obtain information regarding speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of their expertise and the expertise of classroom teachers (CTs), integrated service delivery ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Integrated Service Delivery in School Settings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda K. Elksnin
    The Citadel, Charleston, SC
    Coordinator of Special Education Graduate Programs, Department of Education, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC 29409
  • Gilson J. Capilouto
    The Citadel, Charleston, SC
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Integrated Service Delivery in School Settings
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 258-267. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.258
History: Received June 24, 1993 , Accepted May 6, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 258-267. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.258
History: Received June 24, 1993; Accepted May 6, 1994

Results of a survey of speech-language pathologists who had adopted (i.e., adopters) or who were considering adopting (i.e., nonadopters) integrated speech and language services are presented. The survey was designed to obtain information regarding speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of their expertise and the expertise of classroom teachers (CTs), integrated service delivery approaches they had adopted, the types of speech and language services provided in the classroom, and the characteristics of students served. Adopters’ and nonadopters’ perceptions regarding factors that contribute to effective integrated service delivery are reported, along with perceived advantages and disadvantages for speech-language pathologists, CTs, caseload students, and noncaseload students. Implications of survey results for inservice and preservice training and the future implementation of integrated speech and language services are considered as well.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Citadel Development Foundation.
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