The Effects of Structured Turn-Taking on Disfluencies A Case Study Case Study
Case Study  |   October 01, 1994
The Effects of Structured Turn-Taking on Disfluencies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Winslow
    University of Vermont, Burlington
  • Barry Guitar
    University of Vermont, Burlington
    Department of Communication Sciences, Allen House, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405-0010
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Case Study
Case Study   |   October 01, 1994
The Effects of Structured Turn-Taking on Disfluencies
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 251-257. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.251
History: Received July 2, 1993 , Accepted March 7, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 251-257. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.251
History: Received July 2, 1993; Accepted March 7, 1994

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of structured conversational turn-taking on the amount and types of disfluencies as well as on the speech rate of a 5-year-old boy who stuttered. A single subject design with measures of disfluencies under conditions of structured turn-taking versus no turn-taking was used (ABAB withdrawal design). All analyses were performed on tape recordings of dinner-time conversations in the subject’s home. Results appear to indicate that disfluencies decreased when structured conversational turn-taking was instituted and increased when turn-taking conditions were not enforced. The implications for counseling parents of children who stutter are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We would like to thank Paul Hoffman and Rebecca McCauley for their help given to early drafts of this manuscript. We are also appreciative of the constructive suggestions offered by Nancy Creaghead, Roger Colcord, and an anonymous reviewer.
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