Is a Question a Question? Passage Understanding by Preadolescents With Learning Disabilities This study explored the act of understanding and the ability to answer questions in response to an academic passage in 15 students with learning disabilities (LD), aged 9.4 to 13:4 (years:months). The response measures for subjects with LD were compared with those of academic achievers, matched for gender and age ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Is a Question a Question? Passage Understanding by Preadolescents With Learning Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elisabeth H. Wiig, PhD
    Boston University, MA, 7101 Lake Powell Drive, Arlington, TX 76016
  • Carolyn C. Wilson
    Private Practice, Forth Worth, TX
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Is a Question a Question? Passage Understanding by Preadolescents With Learning Disabilities
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 241-250. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.241
History: Received January 25, 1993 , Accepted March 3, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 241-250. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.241
History: Received January 25, 1993; Accepted March 3, 1994

This study explored the act of understanding and the ability to answer questions in response to an academic passage in 15 students with learning disabilities (LD), aged 9.4 to 13:4 (years:months). The response measures for subjects with LD were compared with those of academic achievers, matched for gender and age (age match), and younger academic achievers matched for gender and basic reading skills (grade 3), aged 8:10 to 9:11 (reading match). All were administered (a) a passage, Wind, presented in simultaneous spoken and read forms, (b) three Piagetian tasks (seriation, classification, and conservation of weights), and (c) the Matrix Analogies Test-EF The passage was associated with 15 questions, 3 each for the knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, and synthesis levels, based on Bloom’s taxonomy (Bloom, 1956). Students with LD performed significantly poorer than the chronological age (CA)-match controls on the total set of questions and on Bloom’s lower- (knowledge, comprehension) and higher-level (application, analysis, synthesis) questions. They performed poorer than the CA- and reading-match groups on the comprehension questions and poorer than the CA-match groups on the synthesis questions. Responses to the knowledge, application, and analysis questions did not differ significantly. The findings suggest that individual assessment of levels of understanding and question answering (Bloom, 1956) may assist in planning intervention objectives and instructional strategies for students with LD.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions bv our statistical consultant, Julie A. Mason, research psychologist at the Timberlawn Psychiatric Research Foundation, Inc. in Dallas, Texas.
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