Nonlinguistic Deficits of Children With Language Disorders Complicate the Interpretation of Their Nonverbal IQ Scores This study supports the hypothesis that the nonlinguistic deficits of children with language impairment (LI) adversely affect their responses to specific item types represented on nonverbal IQ tests (Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Nonverbal Scale, Leiter International Performance Scale, and Matrix Analogies Test-Short Form). Twelve children with normal language (NL) and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Nonlinguistic Deficits of Children With Language Disorders Complicate the Interpretation of Their Nonverbal IQ Scores
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Swisher
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
    The Scottish Rite/University of Arizona Center for Childhood Language Disorders, 33 East Ochoa Street, Tucson, AZ 85701.
  • Elena Plante
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Soren Lowell
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
Article Information
Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Nonlinguistic Deficits of Children With Language Disorders Complicate the Interpretation of Their Nonverbal IQ Scores
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 235-240. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.235
History: Received June 22, 1993 , Accepted January 21, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 235-240. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.235
History: Received June 22, 1993; Accepted January 21, 1994

This study supports the hypothesis that the nonlinguistic deficits of children with language impairment (LI) adversely affect their responses to specific item types represented on nonverbal IQ tests (Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Nonverbal Scale, Leiter International Performance Scale, and Matrix Analogies Test-Short Form). Twelve children with normal language (NL) and 12 with LI (8 to 10 years of age), matched for gender and age, served as subjects. A two-way mixed ANOVA revealed main effects (p<.05) for group and for test, and a Tukey HSD post-hoc analysis indicated significant between-group differences for each test. Robust effect sizes were found with item types judged a priori to assess deficit areas in children with LI. The extent to which certain item types correlated with IQ scores differed by subject group. The findings call into question the use of nonverbal IQ scores as measures of general intelligence or potential as well as their use to qualify children with LI for clinical services.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported by U.S. Department of Education Grant H029D20070, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant K08DC00077, and the Tucson Scottish Rite Charitable Foundation. We thank our colleague, Kenneth Shenkman, PhD, for supervising the data collection.
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