Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Students With Communication Disorders This study investigated the impact collaborative training had on teachers’ perceptions of students with communication disorders. Class rankings for 28 students with communication disorders were collected from 16 teachers, half of whom were trained in the collaborative model and half of whom were not. Teacher rankings for students with communication ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Students With Communication Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly A. Ebert
    The Children’s Medical Center, Dayton, OH
  • Patricia A. Prelock, PhD
    332 Braunstein (ML 379), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0379.
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Students With Communication Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 211-214. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.211
History: Received August 10, 1993 , Accepted April 15, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1994, Vol. 25, 211-214. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2504.211
History: Received August 10, 1993; Accepted April 15, 1994

This study investigated the impact collaborative training had on teachers’ perceptions of students with communication disorders. Class rankings for 28 students with communication disorders were collected from 16 teachers, half of whom were trained in the collaborative model and half of whom were not. Teacher rankings for students with communication disorders were compared to teacher rankings for students without communication disorders who had the same achievement/ability indices (i.e., Stanford Achievement/Otis Lennon). These data were analyzed to determine the differences with which trained and untrained teachers perceived the overall classroom performance of students with communication disorders. Results indicated that teachers who were trained in a collaborative model of service delivery were more accurate in their perceptions of ability levels for students with communication disorders than teachers who were not trained

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was completed as part of the first author’s research in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master’s degree at the University of Cincinnati. The authors wish to thank the teachers and students of the participating school district as well as Rose Maxwell for her technical assistance. Appreciation is also expressed to Ernest Weiler, Nancy Creaghead, and Carole Donnelly for their input during the early stages of the study. Portions of this study were supported by U.S. Department of Education Grant #H029B00096.
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