Using a Facilitating Phonetic Context to Reduce an Unusual Form of Gliding A case study is presented that describes the use of a facilitating phonetic context to decrease the occurrence of an unusual form of gliding. Initially, the child realized the phonemes /l/and /j/as the phone [1]. The process of developing differential phones involved systematic changes that were different from the expected ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   July 01, 1994
Using a Facilitating Phonetic Context to Reduce an Unusual Form of Gliding
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kim Stringfellow
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Sharynne McLeod
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Contact author: Sharynne McLeod, School of Communication Disorders, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, N.S.W. 2141 Australia.
    Contact author: Sharynne McLeod, School of Communication Disorders, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, N.S.W. 2141 Australia.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   July 01, 1994
Using a Facilitating Phonetic Context to Reduce an Unusual Form of Gliding
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 191-193. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.191
History: Received March 1, 1993 , Accepted November 15, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 191-193. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.191
History: Received March 1, 1993; Accepted November 15, 1993

A case study is presented that describes the use of a facilitating phonetic context to decrease the occurrence of an unusual form of gliding. Initially, the child realized the phonemes /l/and /j/as the phone [1]. The process of developing differential phones involved systematic changes that were different from the expected route of development. The intervention technique, based on a facilitating phonetic context, resulted in adult productions of /l/and /j/. This study indicates the potential value of a key word approach in treatment for a recalcitrant phonological disorder.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank S.H. and his parents for their involvement in this study. We also would like to thank Dr. Janis van Doom, Linda Hand, Dr. Nancy Creaghead, and three anonymous reviewers for their contribution to the development of this manuscript.
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