The Complex Syntax Skills of Poor, Urban, African-American Preschoolers at School Entry The present study examines complex syntax production by a sample of 45 preschool-age African-American boys and girls (chronological age [CA] 4:0 to 5:6, years:months) from urban, low-income homes. The results provide quantitative descriptions of amounts of complex syntax and suggest a potential positive relationship between amounts of complex syntax and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1994
The Complex Syntax Skills of Poor, Urban, African-American Preschoolers at School Entry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly K. Craig, PhD
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Julie A. Washington
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Contact author: Holly K. Craig, PhD, Communicative Disorders Clinic, University of Michigan, 1111 E. Catherine Street. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2054
    Contact author: Holly K. Craig, PhD, Communicative Disorders Clinic, University of Michigan, 1111 E. Catherine Street. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2054×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1994
The Complex Syntax Skills of Poor, Urban, African-American Preschoolers at School Entry
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 181-190. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.181
History: Received June 2, 1993 , Accepted January 4, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 181-190. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.181
History: Received June 2, 1993; Accepted January 4, 1994

The present study examines complex syntax production by a sample of 45 preschool-age African-American boys and girls (chronological age [CA] 4:0 to 5:6, years:months) from urban, low-income homes. The results provide quantitative descriptions of amounts of complex syntax and suggest a potential positive relationship between amounts of complex syntax and amounts of nonstandard English form usage in the children's connected speech. Clinical applications are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to thank Minnie O. Phillips, PhD, Barbara Crandall, and the children and parents for their cooperation and participation in this project. The data collection was supported in part by a Biomedical Research Support Grant administered by the Office of the Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan
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