Metapragmatic Awareness of Explanation Adequacy Developing Skills for Academic Success From a Collaborative Communication Skills Unit Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1994
Metapragmatic Awareness of Explanation Adequacy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheri Skurow Kaufman
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Patricia A. Prelock, PhD
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Ernest M. Weiler
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Nancy A. Creaghead
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Carole A. Donnelly
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Contact author: Patricia A. Prelock, PhD, 332 Braunstein (ML 379), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221.
    Contact author: Patricia A. Prelock, PhD, 332 Braunstein (ML 379), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1994
Metapragmatic Awareness of Explanation Adequacy
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 174-180. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.174
History: Received April 13, 1993 , Accepted December 16, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 174-180. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.174
History: Received April 13, 1993; Accepted December 16, 1993

A third-grade classroom participated in a communication skills unit (CSU) that was designed and implemented collaboratively by a teacher, speech-language pathologist, and student speech-language pathologist. The CSU was developed to increase the students' metapragmatic awareness of explanation adequacy. To assess the efficacy of the CSU, two third-grade classrooms were compared. One participated in the CSU, and the other did not. A pre- and post-test were administered to students in both classrooms, requiring them to view a videotape of two children helping each other with math problems, rate the explanations viewed on tape, and justify their ratings. The students' justifications were then coded on three levels by the researcher. Results indicated that only the students who participated in the CSU showed significant improvement in their ability to rate and justify the adequacy of an explanation. The teacher who participated in the CSU observed marked improvement in her students' abilities to ask questions and respond to requests for information solicited by peers.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Research for this article was supported in part by a U.S Department of Education grant awarded to the University of Cincinnati (HO29B0009692). The authors would like to thank Beth Judd, Nancy Reed, and Kelly Ebert for their active roles in developing and implementing the CSU. Special thanks to the participating students at Sharpsburg and Allison Elementary schools, Deborah Bontoft, and the child actors, Andrew Lin and Lauren Ditto. The authors would also like to acknowledge Linda Milosky for providing materials needed to duplicate the metapragmatic task. Finally, special thanks go to Michael Kaufman for his technical assistance.
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