Serving Children With Limited English Proficiency in the Schools A National Survey Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1994
Serving Children With Limited English Proficiency in the Schools
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Celeste A. Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD
    University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA
  • Glenn E. Eicholtz
    California State University, Chico
  • Contact author: Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Avenue, Stockton, CA 95211.
    Contact author: Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Avenue, Stockton, CA 95211.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1994
Serving Children With Limited English Proficiency in the Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 156-164. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.156
History: Received August 31, 1992 , Accepted November 30, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1994, Vol. 25, 156-164. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2503.156
History: Received August 31, 1992; Accepted November 30, 1993

A national survey of public school clinicians (N=1,145) was conducted to assess these clinicians' services to limited English proficient (LEP) children. The main findings of the survey follow:

1. The ethnic group served most commonly by clinicians was Hispanic.

2. The type of treatment provided most frequently for LEP children was language treatment.

3. Ninety percent of the respondents did not speak a second language fluently enough to provide services in that language.

4. Approximately 76% of the respondents had no previous coursework or classes addressing services for LEP children.

5. Problems encountered most frequently by the respondents were the lack of appropriate assessment instruments and the inability to speak the languages of the children they served.

In terms of continuing education topics, respondents were most interested in learning about assessment and treatment procedures for LEP children. Eighty-five percent of the respondents indicated that they felt the best service delivery model for the continuing education of LEP children was workshops offered by school districts. They also expressed interest in coursework offered by universities. Implications of the survey findings for the profession are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was made possible in part by a grant from the College of Education at California State University, Chico. The authors thank Tamara Gill, a student in the Communicative Disorders program at California State University, Chico. Gratitude is also extended to Mike King of California State University, Chico, for his assistance with the statistical analysis of the data. Last, the help and expertise of Associate Editor Bonnie Brinton and two anonymous editorial consultants are gratefully acknowledged.
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