The Magic of "Once Upon a Time" Narrative Teaching Strategies Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
The Magic of "Once Upon a Time"
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly C. Hoggan
    Cache County School District, North Logan, UT
  • Carol J. Strong, EdD
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Contact author: Carol J. Strong, EdD, Department of Communicative Disorders, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322- 1000.
    Contact author: Carol J. Strong, EdD, Department of Communicative Disorders, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322- 1000.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
The Magic of "Once Upon a Time"
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1994, Vol. 25, 76-89. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2502.76
History: Received April 16, 1993 , Accepted August 6, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1994, Vol. 25, 76-89. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2502.76
History: Received April 16, 1993; Accepted August 6, 1993

Speech-language pathologists increasingly use narratives in their oral and written language instruction with students who have language learning disabilities. Twenty narrative teaching strategies were located from an extensive search of the literature, and these are described. Because the strategies can be used at different stages of classroom work, they are categorized by narrative presentation stage as well. Language focus, grade/age level, and teaching context also are suggested for each strategy. Examples are provided for each of the 20 strategies.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The authors acknowledge the contributions of Tobey Fields, Janet Jensen, and William Strong for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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