Interaction Analysis and Self-Study A Single-Case Comparison of Four Methods of Analyzing Supervisory Conferences Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Interaction Analysis and Self-Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Shapiro, PhD
    Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
  • Contact author: David A. Shapiro, PhD, Communication Disorders Program, Department of Human Services, College of Education and Psychology, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC 28723.
    Contact author: David A. Shapiro, PhD, Communication Disorders Program, Department of Human Services, College of Education and Psychology, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC 28723.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Interaction Analysis and Self-Study
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1994, Vol. 25, 67-75. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2502.67
History: Received May 24, 1993 , Accepted July 7, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1994, Vol. 25, 67-75. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2502.67
History: Received May 24, 1993; Accepted July 7, 1993

This article introduces supervisors and supervisees to interaction analysis and self-study in the supervisory process in speech-language pathology and audiology. Four interaction analysis systems served as the basis of a descriptive self-study in which 10 consecutive, individual supervisory conferences were transcribed, coded, and analyzed. Results are reviewed for the purposes of profiling a supervisor’s and supervisee’s conference behavior, monitoring changes in specific supervisory objectives, critiquing the instruments utilized, and demonstrating the importance of self-study. Collecting, analyzing, and sharing objective data are emphasized as components of self-study and as a foundation for understanding the supervisory process and for facilitating professional growth in school-based and other professional settings.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author thanks the student clinician who participated in this investigation, the two other coders, and Wayne A. Secord, A. R. Mallard, Nelson Moses, and two anonymous reviewers for valuable editorial suggestions on an earlier version of this manuscript. Portions of this material were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta, Georgia (1991).
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