Vocal Abuse Prevention Practices A National Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Vocal Abuse Prevention Practices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne P. McNamara
    Klamath Falls City Schools, OR
  • Cecyle K. Perry, PhD
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Contact author: Cecyle K. Perry, PhD, University of Wyoming, University Station, Box 3311, SPPA Department, Laramie, WY 82071-3311.
    Contact author: Cecyle K. Perry, PhD, University of Wyoming, University Station, Box 3311, SPPA Department, Laramie, WY 82071-3311.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Vocal Abuse Prevention Practices
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1994, Vol. 25, 105-111. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2502.105
History: Received February 5, 1993 , Accepted September 20, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1994, Vol. 25, 105-111. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2502.105
History: Received February 5, 1993; Accepted September 20, 1993

A national survey of school-based speech-language pathologists was conducted to assess current practices regarding prevention of functional voice disorders. More than 80% of the 145 respondents did not have vocal abuse prevention programs primarily because of time constraints and the low incidence/low priority they assigned to voice problems. Twenty-seven speech-language pathologists had vocal abuse/misuse programs for groups of asymptomatic and symptomatic children who were primarily in the elementary grades. Positive attitudes about the quality of training received in prevention and treatment of voice disorders, belief in the importance and effectiveness of voice prevention, and belief that hoarseness is caused by vocal misuse/abuse were associated with those who had voice prevention programs.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank the anonymous reviewers for their comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. Part of this project was funded by the Kahn Foundation at the University of Wyoming. This article represents a portion of Anne McNamara’s master’s thesis, completed at the University of Wyoming.
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