Introduction In my first Research to Practice column (January, 1993), I argued that a plurality of theories is necessary to explain the broad scope and complexity of behaviors encompassed by what we call “language.” Formulating a plurality of theories that adequately explains complex behaviors such as language requires the use ... Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   January 01, 1994
Introduction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   January 01, 1994
Introduction
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1994, Vol. 25, 47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2501.47
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1994, Vol. 25, 47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2501.47
In my first Research to Practice column (January, 1993), I argued that a plurality of theories is necessary to explain the broad scope and complexity of behaviors encompassed by what we call “language.” Formulating a plurality of theories that adequately explains complex behaviors such as language requires the use of different methods of inquiry. In recent years, much has been written about the benefits of qualitative, ethnographic methods for understanding and studying language and communication (see, for example, Kovarsky & Crago, 1991). Qualitative research methods often are contrasted with traditional, quantitative methods that are used in much of the published research in social and behavioral sciences, as well as in educational and health-related disciplines such as speech-language pathology and audiology.
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