A Survey of the Extent to Which Speech-Language Pathologists Are Employed in Preschool Programs This report describes a mail survey of general early childhood educators to determine the extent to which they employ speech-language pathologists. Respondents represented a variety of programs, including Head Start, public school pre-kindergarten, public school kindergarten, and community preschool/child care. Participants were selected randomly from the nine U.S. Bureau of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1994
A Survey of the Extent to Which Speech-Language Pathologists Are Employed in Preschool Programs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Wolery
    Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Martha L. Venn
    Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Carol Schroeder
    The Adanta Group, Somerset, KY
  • Ariane Holcombe
    Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Kay Huffman
    Danville Independent Schools Preschool Program, Danville, KY
  • Catherine G. Martin
    Jackson, MO
  • Jeffri Brookfield
    Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Lucy A. Fleming
    Association for Retarded Citizens—Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Mark Wolery, PhD, Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 E. North Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212.
    Contact author: Mark Wolery, PhD, Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 E. North Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1994
A Survey of the Extent to Which Speech-Language Pathologists Are Employed in Preschool Programs
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1994, Vol. 25, 2-8. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2501.02
History: Received September 16, 1992 , Accepted December 16, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1994, Vol. 25, 2-8. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2501.02
History: Received September 16, 1992; Accepted December 16, 1992

This report describes a mail survey of general early childhood educators to determine the extent to which they employ speech-language pathologists. Respondents represented a variety of programs, including Head Start, public school pre-kindergarten, public school kindergarten, and community preschool/child care. Participants were selected randomly from the nine U.S. Bureau of the Census regions. Of the 893 mailed questionnaires, 483 (54.1%) were returned and coded. The respondents indicated that (a) with the exception of the community preschool/child care programs, a majority of the other program types enrolled children with speech-language impairments; (b) mainstreamed programs were more likely to employ speech-language pathologists than non-mainstreamed programs; (c) the employment of speech-language pathologists was not distributed evenly across the four program types; and (d) more programs enrolled children with speech-language disorders than employed speech-language pathologists, even on a part-time, consultant basis. The implications of these findings for policy and practice are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Early Education Program for Children with Disabilities (Research Institute on Preschool Mainstreaming, Grant H024K90005). However, the opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and no official endorsement should be inferred. The authors are grateful for the assistance provided by Dr. Donald Cross, Chairperson of the Department of Special Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; and by Dr. Phillip S. Strain, Director, and Angel Wu, System Analyst, of the Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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