A Proactive Role for Speech-Language Pathologists in Sociolinguistic Education Since sociolinguistics confronted speech and language pathology through the “difference-deficit controversy” over two decades ago (Baratz, 1968; Taylor, 1969), the field gradually has been modifying its basic diagnostic and remediation paradigm to accommodate various sociolinguistic considerations—considerations that now range from the fine-tuned structural details of dialect variation (Williams & ... Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   July 01, 1993
A Proactive Role for Speech-Language Pathologists in Sociolinguistic Education
 
Author Notes
  • A version of this article originally appeared in the October 1992 issue of Ethnotes, II(4), 2–9.
    A version of this article originally appeared in the October 1992 issue of Ethnotes, II(4), 2–9.×
  • Contact author: Walt Wolfram, PhD, Department of English, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8105.
    Contact author: Walt Wolfram, PhD, Department of English, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8105.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   July 01, 1993
A Proactive Role for Speech-Language Pathologists in Sociolinguistic Education
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1993, Vol. 24, 181-185. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2403.181
History: Received December 29, 1992 , Accepted January 15, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1993, Vol. 24, 181-185. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2403.181
History: Received December 29, 1992; Accepted January 15, 1993
Since sociolinguistics confronted speech and language pathology through the “difference-deficit controversy” over two decades ago (Baratz, 1968; Taylor, 1969), the field gradually has been modifying its basic diagnostic and remediation paradigm to accommodate various sociolinguistic considerations—considerations that now range from the fine-tuned structural details of dialect variation (Williams & Wolfram, 1977) to the broad-based cultural setting of speech events (e.g., Damico, Maxwell, & Kovarsky, 1990). Professional speech-language pathologists now are strongly encouraged to obtain, and are held accountable for obtaining, sufficient sociolinguistic expertise to serve a range of culturally and linguistically diverse populations (e.g., Cole & Deal, 1993; Taylor, 1986a,b).
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