Final Consonant Deletion in African American Children Speaking Black English A Closer Look Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1993
Final Consonant Deletion in African American Children Speaking Black English
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Michael J. Moran, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5232.
    Contact author: Michael J. Moran, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5232.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1993
Final Consonant Deletion in African American Children Speaking Black English
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1993, Vol. 24, 161-166. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2403.161
History: Received February 4, 1992 , Accepted February 1, 1993
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1993, Vol. 24, 161-166. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2403.161
History: Received February 4, 1992; Accepted February 1, 1993

The purpose of this study was to determine whether African American children who delete final consonants mark the presence of those consonants in a manner that might be overlooked in a typical speech evaluation. Using elicited sentences from 10 African American children from 4 to 9 years of age, two studies were conducted. First, vowel length was determined for minimal pairs in which final consonants were deleted. Second, listeners who identified final consonant deletions in the speech of the children were provided training in narrow transcription and reviewed the elicited sentences a second time. Results indicated that the children produced longer vowels preceding "deleted" voiced final consonants, and listeners perceived fewer deletions following training in narrow transcription. The results suggest that these children had knowledge of the final consonants perceived to be deleted. Implications for assessment and intervention are discussed.

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