High Reported Spontaneous Stuttering Recovery Rates Fact or Fiction? Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1993
High Reported Spontaneous Stuttering Recovery Rates
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Peter R. Ramig, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, University of Colorado, Box 409, Boulder, CO 80309.
    Contact author: Peter R. Ramig, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, University of Colorado, Box 409, Boulder, CO 80309.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1993
High Reported Spontaneous Stuttering Recovery Rates
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1993, Vol. 24, 156-160. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2403.156
History: Received February 8, 1992 , Accepted November 23, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1993, Vol. 24, 156-160. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2403.156
History: Received February 8, 1992; Accepted November 23, 1992

The families of 21 children who stuttered were contacted 6 to 8 years after their child first was diagnosed as needing intervention for stuttering. The vast majority of these children still were exhibiting a stuttering problem at the time of reassessment. Based on the findings of this survey, there may be reason to question or dispute the high spontaneous recovery rates reported in the literature. Early intervention for the child who stutters during the preschool and elementary school years is encouraged in order to increase a child's probability of coping with a stuttering problem that may not be resolved on its own.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This project was supported in part by a grant from the US WEST Foundation in support of the Colorado Rural Speech and Hearing Outreach Project.
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