Language Sampling Practices A Survey of Nine States Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Language Sampling Practices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Hux
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Mary Morris-Friehe
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Dixie D. Sanger
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Contact author: Karen Hux, PhD, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, 318E Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0738.
    Contact author: Karen Hux, PhD, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, 318E Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0738.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Language Sampling Practices
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 84-91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.84
History: Received January 9, 1992 , Accepted May 14, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 84-91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.84
History: Received January 9, 1992; Accepted May 14, 1992

A total of 239 school-based speech-language pathologists from nine midwestern states were surveyed about their language sampling practices. Survey data provided information on collection and analysis procedures and on clinicians' attitudes toward language sampling. Findings revealed that school speech-language pathologists routinely supplement quantitative assessment procedures with language sample analyses, are sensitive to the effects of some contextual variables on sample representativeness, and use language sampling information to assist in planning intervention services. Points of concern surfacing from the data analysis included clinician reliance on self-designed analysis procedures, limitations in the types of students assessed through language sampling, and the lack of research consultation when clinicians make decisions about collection and analysis procedures.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank Linda Mayer and Gail Hadwiger for their assistance in survey development and data collection.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access