Assessing Complex Behaviors Problems With Reification, Quantification, and Ranking Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   April 01, 1993
Assessing Complex Behaviors
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Memphis State University, TN
  • Contact author: Alan G. Kamhi, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
    Contact author: Alan G. Kamhi, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   April 01, 1993
Assessing Complex Behaviors
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 110-113. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.110
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 110-113. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.110
In my learning disabilities class each year, a student does a presentation on remediating reading comprehension problems. To prepare for the presentation, students read the most recent textbooks and articles that describe strategies to improve reading comprehension. At some point during the presentation, the student will say something like, “The ability to identify the main idea is crucial for reading comprehension.” I casually ask the student to explain why identifying the main idea is so important for reading comprehension. The question is a trap; but, before I let the student fall into it, I ask the class to think about how reading comprehension is measured. The answer, of course, is that one way in which reading comprehension is measured is by asking readers to identify the main idea of the story.
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