"Teachers' Perceptions of Stutterers" A Reply to a Replication Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1993
"Teachers' Perceptions of Stutterers"
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Norman J. Lass
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • Dennis M. Ruscello
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • John F. Schmitt
    University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • Mary D. Pannbacker
    Louisiana State University Medical Center, Shreveport
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1993
"Teachers' Perceptions of Stutterers"
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 108-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.108b
History: Received November 24, 1992 , Accepted November 25, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 108-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.108b
History: Received November 24, 1992; Accepted November 25, 1992
We were pleased to learn of Silverman and Marik’s findings in their replication of our study on teachers’ perceptions of students who stutter (Lass et al., 1992b). It appears that they obtained very similar results, with the most frequently mentioned adjectives reflecting negative personality characteristics, such as shy, insecure, frustrated, anxious, and self-conscious.
It is interesting to note that we obtained similar responses from other groups of subjects in addition to teachers, including college students majoring in speech-language pathology and audiology (Ruscello, Lass, French, & Channel, 1989–1990), college students majoring in other fields (Ruscello, Lass, & Brown, 1988), professors (Ruscello et al., 1990–1991), special educators (Ruscello et al., 1992), school administrators (Lass et al., 1992a), and even speech-language pathologists (Lass et al., 1989). It should be noted that the respondents in all of these studies, including the replication study by Silverman and Marik, were told simply to list as many adjectives as they could think of that, in their opinion, accurately described four hypothetical stutterers, but they were not told to list specific types of adjectives. Yet in all of these studies the most frequently reported adjectives were negative personality traits.
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