Metaphoric Comprehension in Adolescents With Traumatic Brain Injury and in Adolescents With Language Learning Disability The purpose of the present study was to compare comprehension of figurative language in the form of metaphors between adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and adolescents with language learning disability (LLD). The metaphoric comprehension subtest of the Test of Language Competence (Wiig & Secord, 1985) was administered to adolescents ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1993
Metaphoric Comprehension in Adolescents With Traumatic Brain Injury and in Adolescents With Language Learning Disability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger L. Towne
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Laura M. Entwisle
    Hollister, Missouri, Public Schools
  • Contact author: Roger L. Towne, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Fairchild 204, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61761.
    Contact author: Roger L. Towne, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Fairchild 204, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61761.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1993
Metaphoric Comprehension in Adolescents With Traumatic Brain Injury and in Adolescents With Language Learning Disability
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 100-107. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.100
History: Received May 18, 1992 , Accepted September 23, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1993, Vol. 24, 100-107. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2402.100
History: Received May 18, 1992; Accepted September 23, 1992

The purpose of the present study was to compare comprehension of figurative language in the form of metaphors between adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and adolescents with language learning disability (LLD). The metaphoric comprehension subtest of the Test of Language Competence (Wiig & Secord, 1985) was administered to adolescents and young adults with TBI, to those with LLD, and to subjects without TBI and LLD (normal subjects). The results indicated that the subjects with TBI comprehended metaphors little differently than did the normal subjects. The subjects with LLD, in contrast, demonstrated significantly poorer comprehension of metaphors than both the normal subjects and subjects with TBI. These results are discussed in relation to appropriate special education needs and placement of the student with TBI.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This study was based on a master’s project conducted at Southwest Missouri State University. The authors thank the administrators and staff of the following institutions for providing the subjects for this project: Mount Vernon Rehabilitation Center, Mount Vernon, Missouri; Fair Grove High School, Fair Grove, Missouri; Learning Diagnostic Center, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield; and Bellwether Institute, Springfield, Missouri.
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