Clarification of a Misperception in Pannbacker's "Some Common Myths About Voice Therapy" I would like to make the following comments in response to Mary Pannbacker’s article “Some Common Myths About Voice Therapy” (1992). Pannbacker quoted Peterson-Falzone’s letter to the editor (1984) in reference to an article written by Andrews, Tardy, and Pasternak (1984). It is implied by both Pannbacker and Peterson-Falzone ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   January 01, 1993
Clarification of a Misperception in Pannbacker's "Some Common Myths About Voice Therapy"
 
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   January 01, 1993
Clarification of a Misperception in Pannbacker's "Some Common Myths About Voice Therapy"
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1993, Vol. 24, 54-55. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2401.54b
History: Received February 20, 1992 , Accepted March 30, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1993, Vol. 24, 54-55. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2401.54b
History: Received February 20, 1992; Accepted March 30, 1992
I would like to make the following comments in response to Mary Pannbacker’s article “Some Common Myths About Voice Therapy” (1992). Pannbacker quoted Peterson-Falzone’s letter to the editor (1984) in reference to an article written by Andrews, Tardy, and Pasternak (1984). It is implied by both Pannbacker and Peterson-Falzone that Andrews et al. suggest palatal and pharyngeal training procedures, rather than medical and surgical intervention, to modify hypernasality in young children. This is not so. In the opening paragraph of “The Modification of Hypernasality in Young Children: A Programming Approach” (Andrews et al., 1984), we clearly stated that the first step is always to make the necessary referrals to establish velopharyngeal adequacy. The child described in our article was, in fact, referred to our center after treatment in an oro-facial clinic, with a recommendation for voice treatment. Our article presented ideas for how basic concepts were taught, in ways that meshed with the young child’s developmental level. The team approach, with contributions from clinicians in both medical and educational settings, is certainly the approach of choice for the treatment of school-age children with velopharyngeal inadequacy. Our article addressed the educational aspects of programming. I would like to correct the misperception that behavioral therapy was advocated without prior consideration of the physical determinants of the hypernasality.
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