Adolescent Language Programs In recent years, many states have mandated that all students have access to diploma options rather than a single standard diploma. As a result, school districts have restructured programs and curricula to meet the needs of a wide range of students with varying learning styles. Services to middle and high ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 1993
Adolescent Language Programs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rhonda S. Work
    Florida Department of Education, Tallahassee, FL
  • JoAn A. Cline
    School Board of Pinellas County, Clearwater, FL
  • Barbara J. Ehren
    School Board of Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, FL
  • Diane L. Keiser
    Lincoln County School District, Lincoln City, OR
  • Christine Wujek
    South Metropolitan Association, Flossmoor, IL
  • Contact author: Rhonda S. Work, PhD, Florida Department of Education, Tallahassee, FL 32399.
    Contact author: Rhonda S. Work, PhD, Florida Department of Education, Tallahassee, FL 32399.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Clinical Forum: Adolescent Language
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 1993
Adolescent Language Programs
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1993, Vol. 24, 43-53. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2401.43
History: Received October 28, 1991 , Accepted July 16, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1993, Vol. 24, 43-53. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2401.43
History: Received October 28, 1991; Accepted July 16, 1992

In recent years, many states have mandated that all students have access to diploma options rather than a single standard diploma. As a result, school districts have restructured programs and curricula to meet the needs of a wide range of students with varying learning styles. Services to middle and high school students with communication disorders have been evaluated, and new or modified programs have been designed to meet the needs of adolescent learners. Programs for students with language disorders have been developed, based on secondary-school organization and on the philosophy that earning credit for classes in speech-language is appropriate for these students. Four school programs from across the United States are described in this article, which presents sample segments of individual education plans (IEPs) from these programs.

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