Speech Normalization in Developmental Phonological Disorders A Retrospective Study of Capability-Focus Theory Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1993
Speech Normalization in Developmental Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Joan Kwiatkowski or Lawrence D. Shriberg, The Phonology Project, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705.
    Contact author: Joan Kwiatkowski or Lawrence D. Shriberg, The Phonology Project, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1993
Speech Normalization in Developmental Phonological Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1993, Vol. 24, 10-18. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2401.10
History: Received March 10, 1992 , Accepted May 15, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1993, Vol. 24, 10-18. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2401.10
History: Received March 10, 1992; Accepted May 15, 1992

A two-factor theory is proposed to explain individual differences in intervention outcomes for children with speech delays. Indices of Capability include linguistic measures of a child's comprehension and production phonology and risk factors. Indices of Focus include clinical responses to children's motivation for speech change and level of effort. Retrospective data from clinical records of 75 children who received intervention services in a phonology clinic provide a preliminary test of the proposed two-factor theory. Discriminant function analyses suggest that correlates of Focus are sensitive to factors associated with failure to make progress during intervention. Implications of these findings for prospective predictive research are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank all the student clinicians whose clinical reports in the phonology clinic at the University of Wisconsin-Madison between September 1984 and May 1991 provided the data for this study. They also thank Doris Kistler for steady statistical guidance and Dorothy Rorick for excellent editorial assistance. Research was supported by the Public Health Service, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Grant DC-00496.
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