Communication Development and Differences in Children Adopted From China and Eastern Europe Purpose The communication development of children adopted from China and Eastern Europe was compared by region of origin at 6 and 12 months after adoption. Method Twenty children, recruited before or immediately following their adoption, participated in the study. Measures were collected between 2 and 6 months after ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 2010
Communication Development and Differences in Children Adopted From China and Eastern Europe
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah A. Hwa-Froelich
    Saint Louis University, MO
  • Hisako Matsuo
    Saint Louis University, MO
  • Contact author: Deborah A. Hwa-Froelich, 3750 Lindell Boulevard, 12 McGannon Hall, St. Louis, MO 63108. E-mail: hwafroda@slu.edu.
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / International & Global / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 2010
Communication Development and Differences in Children Adopted From China and Eastern Europe
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2010, Vol. 41, 349-366. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0085)
History: Received July 23, 2008 , Revised January 16, 2009 , Accepted July 2, 2009
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2010, Vol. 41, 349-366. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0085)
History: Received July 23, 2008; Revised January 16, 2009; Accepted July 2, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose The communication development of children adopted from China and Eastern Europe was compared by region of origin at 6 and 12 months after adoption.

Method Twenty children, recruited before or immediately following their adoption, participated in the study. Measures were collected between 2 and 6 months after adoption (Time 1) and between 12 and 14 months after adoption (Time 2). The children’s ages ranged between 11–22 months and 22–34 months, respectively. Parent-reported vocabulary comprehension and expression and behavioral communication assessments were administered.

Results No significant differences between region of origin were found at Time 1. At Time 2, significant group differences in expressive language performance were found, with children adopted from China and Eastern Europe demonstrating different patterns of English language development.

Conclusion Early prelinguistic measures may provide prognostic indicators for later English language development. Children adopted from different countries where they are initially exposed to different birth languages may acquire English differently.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was funded by Regionwise from the metropolitan St. Louis region. We are grateful for the hard work and support of the many persons who collaborated on the project: Anne Ackerson, Katie Anderson, Keith Clemson, Sarah Mills, Amy Moleski, Elizabeth Mueller, Clayton Notgras, J. Douglas Pettinelli, Christin Pryor, Kim Smith, Elizabeth Voyles, Margaret Walkenhorst, Danileah Werner, and Janine Zahrli. We appreciate the help John Clements provided in creating the figures and editing provided by Sara Steele.This project would not have been possible without the help of the adoption agencies who helped us recruit families: Americans Adopting Orphans, Catholic Services, Children’s Hope International, Children of the World, Dillon International, Foreign Adoption Clinic and Educational Services, Families with Children from China, International Family Services, Love Basket, Small World Adoption Foundation, and Ultimate Places. We would also like to thank the families who participated in and supported this project.
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