The Effect of Instruction in L1 on Receptive Acquisition of L2 for Bilingual Children With Language Delay This investigation compared the rate of receptive acquisition of English prepositions and pronouns for two groups of bilingual first grade children with language delays. Group A received instruction in Spanish prior to instruction in English, and Group B received instruction in English only. The results indicated that the subjects in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
The Effect of Instruction in L1 on Receptive Acquisition of L2 for Bilingual Children With Language Delay
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph A. Perozzi, PhD
    Speech-Language Pathology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968-0639
  • Maria Lourdes Chavez Sanchez
    Socorro Independent School District, TX
  • Contact author: Joseph A. Perozzi, PhD, Speech-Language Pathology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968-0639.
    Contact author: Joseph A. Perozzi, PhD, Speech-Language Pathology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968-0639.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
The Effect of Instruction in L1 on Receptive Acquisition of L2 for Bilingual Children With Language Delay
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 348-352. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.348
History: Received November 14, 1991 , Accepted April 2, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 348-352. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.348
History: Received November 14, 1991; Accepted April 2, 1992

This investigation compared the rate of receptive acquisition of English prepositions and pronouns for two groups of bilingual first grade children with language delays. Group A received instruction in Spanish prior to instruction in English, and Group B received instruction in English only. The results indicated that the subjects in Group A acquired the English prepositions and pronouns twice as rapidly as the subjects in Group B. These results support the interdependence hypothesis and the practice of language intervention in a child’s native language (L1).

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank Inocente Quintanilla, Linda Cooper, and Sue Shook (administrators in the Socorro Independent School District [ISD]) and Alfonso Neria and Ana Mora (Socorro ISD speech-language pathologists) for their support. The authors also thank Jack S. Damico for his review and critique of an earlier version of this manuscript.
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