Self-Monitoring Effects on Articulation Carryover in School-Age Children The purpose of this study was to field-test a treatment strategy for bringing about articulation carryover in school-age children. Subjects were 8 elementary school students who misarticulated /s/ or /r/ in conversation outside the treatment setting, but who correctly articulated the target phoneme 80% or more of the time in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Self-Monitoring Effects on Articulation Carryover in School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shelley I. Gray
    Marana Unified School District, 6721 N. Pomona Road, Tucson, AZ 85704
  • Ralph L. Shelton
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Shelley I. Gray, Marana Unified School District, 6721 N. Pomona Road, Tucson, AZ 85704.
    Contact author: Shelley I. Gray, Marana Unified School District, 6721 N. Pomona Road, Tucson, AZ 85704.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Self-Monitoring Effects on Articulation Carryover in School-Age Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 334-342. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.334
History: Received November 29, 1990 , Accepted December 2, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 334-342. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.334
History: Received November 29, 1990; Accepted December 2, 1991

The purpose of this study was to field-test a treatment strategy for bringing about articulation carryover in school-age children. Subjects were 8 elementary school students who misarticulated /s/ or /r/ in conversation outside the treatment setting, but who correctly articulated the target phoneme 80% or more of the time in conversation with the speech-language pathologist in the treatment setting. The self-monitoring treatment strategy of Koegel, Koegel, and Ingham (1986) and Koegel, Koegel, Van Voy, and Ingham (1988) was selected for field-testing. Data were collected in the context of a multiple-baseline-across-subjects research design. Results of this study did not replicate the positive treatment effects found in the Koegel et al. studies. The results are discussed in relation to the subject, treatment, environment, and measurement variables that may have accounted for the discrepancy in treatment effectiveness.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This article represents a portion of Shelley Gray’s master’s thesis completed at the University of Arizona.
The authors thank Drs. Richard Curlee and Anthony DeFeo for their appraisal of this research and speech-language pathologists Sue Strautman, Pat Melvin, Diane Loebig, and Debra Goodman for their treatment delivery. Special thanks to the students, parents, and teachers of the Amphitheater Public Schools in Tucson for their participation. To our volunteer observers, Patty McMahon, Sharon Barchfield, Rebecca Berschauer, Bettina Cardenas, Paige Charlton, Johanna Crawford, Anne Hubbard, Stefani Kelso, Raquel Rosen, Kathy Sooter, and Suzette Vaughn, thank you for your time and efforts.
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