Informativeness As a Clinical Principle What’s Really New? Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Informativeness As a Clinical Principle
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patti Sorensen
    Barons-Eureka-Warner Health Unit
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Hearing and Speech, 39th and Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66103
  • Contact author: Marc E. Fey, University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Hearing and Speech, 39th and Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66103.
    Contact author: Marc E. Fey, University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Hearing and Speech, 39th and Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66103.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Informativeness As a Clinical Principle
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 320-328. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.320
History: Received November 26, 1990 , Accepted August 26, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 320-328. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.320
History: Received November 26, 1990; Accepted August 26, 1991

This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a lexical facilitation strategy that employed an adaptation of the experimental paradigm developed by Snyder (1978). This paradigm is intended to increase the salience or novelty (i.e., informativeness) of target objects relative to other objects and actions in the context. Although the treatment met with moderate success in helping the children to use words they did not previously produce, there was no evidence that the experimental paradigm contributed to the treatment effect. Some of the complications in employing the experimental task in the intervention setting are discussed, and some suggestions for modifying the task for treatment purposes are presented.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was performed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the first author’s MSc degree in the Department of Communicative Disorders at the University of Western Ontario. The study and preparation of the manuscript were partially supported by funds received from the Arlene Matkin Memorial Scholarship. The authors would like to thank Daniel Ling, Michael Pressley, and Genese Warr-Leeper for their helpful comments about the study. Bonnie Brinton, Diane Frome-Loeb, Marilyn Nippold, and two anonymous reviewers made comments about earlier drafts for which we are grateful. We would also like to thank Donna Forrest-Pressley, Laurel Power, Keith Rose, and Pearl Leaney for their help at various stages of this project. The cooperation and assistance of the children’s parents and nursery school teachers was greatly appreciated.
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